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Kathleen Mullaniff - Senior Lecturer in Fine Art - ADRI
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Kathleen Mullaniff - Senior Lecturer in Fine Art

Kathleen Mullaniff

Senior Lecturer in Fine Art

Kathleen Mullaniff is a member of the Diasporas Research Cluster.

 

Kathleen Mullaniff trained at University of the Arts, Camberwell College of Art and Design (BA Fine Art Painting) and at the University of London, Goldsmiths College (MA Fine Art).

She has exhibited in Painting as a ‘Foreign as a Language’ at Cultura Inglesa Sao Paulo. ‘Fabric Reinterpreting the House’ at Abbott Hall Art Gallery. ‘Loop’ at Bankfield Museum, ‘Showhouse’ at PM Gallery and House.

She was awarded an AHRC grant in 2002 in order to research the botanical drawings of, Les Roses, by Pierre-Joseph Redoute. In 2004 she participated in ‘Purl’ at The Museum of Domestic Design and Architecture where three UK artists and three artists from the USA used the textile archive to make original works. In 2007 she participated in ‘Paisley: exploding the teardrop’ at PM Gallery and House which was featured in the BBC Womens Hour.

In 2004 she co-founded the Patternlab and took part in Touch, Textiles, Technology: collaboration across Europe at Goldsmiths College and Containing Culture: Lacking in Discipline at Manchester Metropolitain University. The Patternlab was also features in Textiles: The Fabric of Fine Art.

Her current research is focused upon making paintings from the floral images of Marrian North who was a botanical artist (1830-1890. In May 2012 she presented a one-person exhibition entitled ‘Fade in Fade’ out at the Tokarska Gallery in London.

Kathleen has taught Fine Art at a number of universities including the Northumbria University, Newcastle and Central St Martins College of Art and Design. She has been an external examiner at Camberwell College of Art and Design and the University of Hertfordshire. From 1992/02 she was the BA Fine Art Programme Leader at Middlesex University where she is a Senior Lecturer on the BA Fine Art Programme.

Kathleen is represented by Andrea Harari of Jaggedart, London.

 

Fade in Fade out

Paint Love and Labour. Solo Exhibition Tokarska Gallery London. May 2012.

Fade in Fade out

‘Artist and painter, Kathleen Mullaniff, has a second obsession. An obsession which is at once attached to and envelope her small studio. The visitor is invited into the garden, and eventually through a garland of soft winter hues that surround the entrance to her studio. The borders are dormant now. But cross the threshold into the studio and these same sleeping winter colours are revealed through line and mark, in a series of pristine canvases. Marianne North would recognize the samples of seedpods, branches, twigs, dried petals and leaves imported into the studio from the garden, the salvaged fragments that form the still lifesource for this series of immaculate paintings. Marianne intrepid explorer and botanist and the inspiration for Kathleen’s new body of work, collected her specimens from the furthest reaches of the natural world. Her expansive travel and analytical account of the exotic, compliments Kathleen’s newest work where stepping into the garden, has re-envigorated and affirmed the notion of place, the local close up, an intimate commune with the melancholy of change, the micro into the macro, William Blake’s ‘world in a grain of sand’. Text by Eugene Palmer.

Fade out 2012 Oil on Canvas

Fade out 2012 Oil on Canvas

Paisley: exploding the teardrop exhibition PM Gallery and House. London. Nov 2007-Jan 2008

Encrypted 1-8 Enamel on Canvas

Paisley: Exploding the Teardrop reflects the first appearance of the teardrop-shaped buta (buta means 'flower' in Hindi) or paisley motif in Babylon and its travels through time, continents and cultures. Paisley's evolution can be traced in textiles, painting and tiles, across India and into Europe in the18th century, mass production of the paisley shawl in Paisley, Scotland in the 19th century, followed by its widespread appearance during the 1960s, epitomising the influence of Indian culture on psychedelia. the stories of Paisley’s townsfolk or ‘buddies’ as they relate their hometown’s rich textile heritage.

The 'buta’' or paisley motif is surrounded by myth and legend. It has been likened to the young shoots of the date palm, which was necessary for existence, as it provided food, wine, thatch, wood, paper and string and is thought to have been the ‘prototype’ for the tree of life. Today the irrepressible paisley motif is part of the popular iconography of contemporary art and design.

Encrypted 1-8 Enamel on Canvas.

Encrypted 1-8 Enamel on Canvas.

Encrypted 1-8 Enamel on Canvas